Committee Membership Information

Study Title:

Development and Implementation of a Cleanup Technology Roadmap for DOE's Office of Environmental Management

Study Director:


Dr. Edwin P. Przybylowicz - (Chair)
Eastman Kodak Company [Retired]

Chair Edwin P. Przybylowicz retired in 1991 after over 35 years with the Eastman Kodak Company as senior vice president and director of research. He became assistant director, Kodak Research Laboratories in 1983, was named director of research and elected as senior vice president of the company in August 1985. He has served as a commissioner of the U.S.-Polish Joint Fund for Cooperation in Science and Engineering, a program that fosters the collaboration of Polish and U.S. scientists, chairing conferences and workshops on technology transfer in Poland, the Czech Republic, and Russia. From 1994 to 1996, he was director of the Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He is currently an elected member of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Bureau and Executive Committee, and is past-chair of the U.S. National Committee for IUPAC. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1990 and has served on numerous National Research Council committees, including co-chair of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology and chair of the Committee to Review the Worker and Public Health Activities Program. He currently chairs the Committee on Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures for the Board of Army Science and Technology. Dr. Przybylowicz received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Mr. Allen G. Croff - (Vice Chair)
Oak Ridge National Laboratory [Retired]

Vice-Chair Allen G. Croff retired from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the end of 2003 and is now an independent consultant. While employed at ORNL, Mr. Croff was involved in technical studies and program development focused on waste management and nuclear fuel cycles. Mr. Croff chaired a committee of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) that produced the 2002 report titled Risk-Based Classification of Radioactive and Hazardous Chemical Wastes; he is currently a member of the NCRP. He also chaired the Nuclear Energy Agency's Nuclear Development Committee for a decade and is currently vice-chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste and a member of the Department of Energy?s Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee. Mr. Croff has served on numerous National Research Council committees, including the High-Level Waste in Tanks; Technologies for Remediation of High-Level Waste Tanks in the DOE Weapons Complex; Remediation of Buried and Tank Wastes; Long-Term Institutional Management of DOE Legacy Waste Sites; Risk-Based Approaches for Disposition of Transuranic and High-Level Radioactive Waste; and Management of Certain Radioactive Waste Streams Stored in Tanks at Three Department of Energy Sites. Mr. Croff currently serves on the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board. He received his B.S. in chemical engineering from Michigan State University, Nuclear Engineer Degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and an M.B.A. from the University of Tennessee.


Dr. Robin D. Rogers
University of Alabama

Robin Rogers is an expert in separations chemistry and does research on prevention or chemical treatment of waste streams. He is the Robert Ramsay Chair of Chemistry, Distinguished Research Professor, and director of the Center for Green Manufacturing at The University of Alabama. Dr. Rogers' research interests include green/sustainable separation science and technology, aqueous biphasic systems, room temperature ionic liquids, environmentally benign polymer resins, crystal engineering, and radiochemistry. Dr. Rogers is the editor of the American Chemical Society journal Crystal Growth & Design. Dr. Rogers received a B.S. and a Ph.D., both in chemistry, from The University of Alabama, and he reached the rank of presidential research professor at Northern Illinois University before returning to Alabama. He served on a National Research Council studies Long-Term Research Needs for Radioactive High-Level Waste at Department of Energy Sites and Risk-Based Approaches for Disposition of Transuranic and High-Level Radioactive Waste.


Dr. J. Leslie Smith
University of British Columbia

Leslie Smith is the Cominco Chair in Minerals and the Environment at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. His expertise is in the areas of subsurface hydrology and contaminant transport processes. His current research interests include hydrologic processes in unsaturated waste rock piles, submarine groundwater discharge to the near-shore marine environment, surface water ? groundwater interactions, transport processes in fractured rock masses, hydrogeological decision analysis and risk assessment. In recent years, Dr. Smith has served on six National Research Council?s studies, including the Review of the Hanford Site's Environmental Remediation Science and Technology Plan and Management of Certain Radioactive Waste Streams Stored in Tanks at Three Department of Energy Sites.


Dr. Richelle M. Allen-King
State University of New York at Buffalo

Dr. Richelle Allen-King is a Professor of Geology at University at Buffalo (SUNY). She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo and B.A. from the Department of Chemistry at the University of California, San Diego. Her research focuses on the geochemical processes that control the fate and transport of contaminants in ground and surface waters. She was selected as the National Ground Water Associations Henry Darcy Distinguished Lecturer for 2003 and in that role presented her research at more than 60 national and international venues. She has served on groundwater remediation and aquifer storage committees for the National Research Council and as well as serving two terms as a member of their Water Science and Technology Board. She has also served as Associate Editor for the journals Ground Water and Water Resources Research. Recent funding for her research has been received from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes for Water Research, and the Department of Energy?s Office of Science.


Dr. Edward Lahoda
Westinghouse Science and Technology Center

Edward Lahoda is a Consulting engineer at the Westinghouse Electric Science and Technology Department. He has more than 32 years of experience in process analysis, development, design, and field support. He has extensive background in the manufacture of uranium-based fuels and operation of the waste treatment and other ancillary systems. In the environmental area he was responsible for the technical development and field startup of the Westinghouse soil washing and high-temperature thermal desorption technologies. He has chemical process design experience in processing chemical warfare agents, nuclear fuels, and high-and low-level nuclear wastes and in plasma processing of wastes and plasma production of specialty materials. He has served on committees at the Savannah River Site addressing overall operation and test data validity of the Defense Waste Processing Facility, chaired the In-Tank Precipitation Chemistry Review Panel, and was a member of the In-Tank Precipitation Replacement Review Panel. He has also participated on the committees to review the development and design of the Waste Treatment Plant and the bulk vitrification facility at Hanford. He is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Dr. Lahoda received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering and his M.B.A. from the University of Pittsburgh. He served as a technical expert for the National Research Council Committee on Alternative High-Level Waste Treatment at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and as a committee member on the study Long-Term Research Needs for Radioactive High-Level Waste at Department of Energy Sites.


Dr. Thomas F. Gesell
Idaho State University

Thomas F. Gesell is an authority in health physics and environmental radiation monitoring, both of which must be considered in assessing waste characterization and treatment options. He is professor of health physics and director of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Idaho State University. Previously, he worked for the DOE Idaho Operations Office as deputy assistant manager for nuclear programs and director of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory. Dr. Gesell was a faculty member of the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston for ten years. He is a fellow of the Health Physics Society and a former member of its Board of Directors. He is currently a vice-president and member of the Board of Directors of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. He served a six-year term as a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board's Radiation Advisory Committee and several years as a consultant. He was a consultant to the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. Dr. Gesell has B.S. in physics from San Diego State University and received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physics (with specialization in health physics) from the University of Tennessee. Dr. Gesell has served on several National Research Council committees, including Opportunities for Accelerating Characterization and Treatment of Waste at DOE Nuclear Weapons Sites.


Dr. Gary P. Halada
State University of New York at Stony Brook

Gary P. Halada is an associate professor of materials science and engineering and associate director of the Laboratory for Surface Analysis and Corrosion Science at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook. He is also co-principal investigator of the joint Brookhaven National Laboratory-Stony Brook Center for Environmental Molecular Science (CEMS), which is jointly supported by NSF and DOE to study the sequestration, fate, and transport of metals in the environment. Dr. Halada's primary research focus is on surface chemistry of environment-materials interactions. His current studies focus on the association of uranium and transuranics with organic ligands and with large biomacromoleules including cellulose and cellulosic breakdown products. He has published more than 80 peer-reviewed journal and proceedings articles and several chapters on environment-materials interactions, surface chemistry and engineering, remediation, and development of novel analytical techniques. Dr. Halada received his BS in physics and a PhD in materials science, both from SUNY Stony Brook.


Dr. Andrew M. Sessler
E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Andrew M. Sessler is distinguished emeritus scientist at E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California. He served as director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory from 1973-1980 and as distinguished senior scientist from 1980-2001. His areas of expertise are in particle accelerator physics and plasma physics. He served as president of the American Physical Society in 1998, and past president in 1999. He has served as council member, vice chairman, and chairman of the Federation of American Scientists. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the New York Academy of Sciences. He co-founded the human rights group, Scientists for Sakharov, Orlov and Sharansky (SOS) for which he received the first APS Nicholson Medal for Humanitarian Service in 1994. His awards include the Ernesto Lawrence Award, the U.S. Particle Accelerator School Prize, and the Wilson Prize. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in theoretical physics from Columbia University. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1990 and is currently serving on the National Research Council?s Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board.


Dr. Gary S. Sayler
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

GARY S. SAYLER (Ph.D., bacteriology and biochemistry, University of Idaho) is the Beaman Distinguished Professor in the Department of Microbiology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville; director of the University of Tennessee?Oak Ridge National Laboratory Joint Institute for Biological Sciences; and adjunct professor at Gwangju Institute for Science and Technology, South Korea. His research interests include microbiology, genetic engineering, molecular biology in biodegradation, bioremediation, and bioprocessing; polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soils, sediments, and water; molecular ecology in biological waste treatment, PCR-gene probes, biosensors for bioavailable pollutants including endocrine disruptors; and nanotechnology and carbon nanofibers in microbial biofilms. Dr. Sayler has edited five books and contributed 285 publications in broad areas of molecular biology, environmental microbiology, biodegradation of PCB, PAH, BTEX and TCE, and biotechnology. He holds 12 patents on environmental gene probing, genetic engineering for bioremediation, biosensor technology, and environmental gene expression. He received the NIEHS? Research Career Development Award (1980-1985); was named a Top 100 Innovator in Science by Science Digest (1985); received the American Society for Microbiology, Procter and Gamble Award for Environmental Microbiology (1994), the Distinguished Alumni Award of the University of Idaho (1995), and the DOW Chemical Foundation SPHERE Award (1998-2000). He was elected to the American Academy of Microbiology in 1991 and is a lifetime member. Dr. Sayler served as a committee member for the National Research Council study on Research Opportunities for Deactivating and Decommissioning Department of Energy Facilities, and on a review subcommittee on standoff explosives detection. He is currently a member of the Environmental Protection Agency?s Science Advisory Board Drinking Water Committee and is an executive committee member of the Board of Scientific Counselors for EPA?s Office of Research and Development.


Dr. Sue B. Clark
Washington State University

Sue B. Clark is an expert in environmental chemistry of plutonium and other actinides, chemistry of high-level radioactive waste systems, and chemistry of actinide-bearing solid phases in natural environments. She is chair of the Department of Chemistry and Westinghouse Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Washington State University in Pullman. Previously, she was an assistant research ecologist at the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and senior scientist at Westinghouse Savannah River Company's Savannah River Technology Center. She currently is a member of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. She received her Ph.D. in inorganic and radiochemistry from Florida State University. She has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Review of the Hanford Site's Environmental Remediation Science and Technology Plan, and she serves on the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board.


Dr. Patricia J. Culligan
Columbia University

Patricia J. Culligan is professor of civil engineering and engineering mechanics at Columbia University. Her research focuses on applying geoengineering principles to understand and control the migration of contaminants from waste disposal sites. In particular, she studies the behavior of miscible contaminants and nonaqueous phase liquids in soil and fractured rock and the effectiveness of in situ remediation strategies for the cleanup of waste sites. She also has interest and experience in the design of land-based disposal sites for waste materials. Dr. Culligan has received numerous awards, including the Arthur C. Smith Award for Undergraduate Service (1999) and the National Science Foundation CAREER Award (1999). She is also the author or coauthor of more than 50 journal articles, book chapters, and refereed conference papers. Dr. Culligan has a Ph.D. in civil engineering from Cambridge University, England. She has served on three National Research Council committees, including Long-Term Institutional Management of DOE Legacy Waste Sites; Opportunities for Accelerating Characterization and Treatment of Waste at DOE Nuclear Weapons Sites; and Management of Certain Radioactive Waste Streams Stored in Tanks at Three Department of Energy Sites.


Dr. Rachael Jean Detwiler
Braun Intertec Corporation

Rachel J. Detwiler is associate and senior engineer at Braun Intertec Corporation in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Her areas of expertise are construction troubleshooting, concrete durability, transport properties, microstructure, and test methods for concrete and cement-based materials. Dr. Detwiler previously worked as a principal engineer at Construction Technology Laboratories; an assistant professor at the University of Toronto; postdoctoral research fellow at Norges Tekniske Hogskole, Trondheim, Norway; and a design and materials engineer with ABAM Engineers, Inc. She is a member of the American Society for Testing and Materials and a fellow of the American Concrete Institute, where she served as chair of Committee 227 on Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management, and as a member of Committee 201 on Durability of Concrete and the Publications Committee. She is chair of Committee 234 on Silica Fume in Concrete. She also served in an advisory role until 1986 for the initial development of a formulation of grout for the stabilization of radioactive and hazardous waste in underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. Dr. Detwiler has has published over 50 technical papers related to concrete microscopy, durability, and testing. Dr. Detwiler has served on two National Research Council committees, including Long-Term Research Needs for Deactivation and Decommissioning at Department of Energy Sites and Management of Certain Radioactive Waste Streams Stored in Tanks at Three Department of Energy Sites.


Dr. Carolyn L. Huntoon
CLH Associates, Inc.

Carolyn L. Huntoon is recognized for improving management practices and technical approaches to DOE site cleanup problems as the former DOE assistant secretary for Environmental Management. She held this Senate-confirmed position from July 1999 until July 2001. She is currently an independent consultant in the fields of energy and aerospace. Before moving to DOE, Dr. Huntoon served in various scientific and management positions at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), including director of the Johnson Space enter in Houston, Texas, and special assistant to the administrator of NASA in Washington, D.C. In addition, she served as an executive in residence in the George Washington University Project Management Program and spent two years at the White House in the Office of Science and Technology Policy. She is a fellow of the American Astronautical Society, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Aerospace Medical Association. Dr. Huntoon has been awarded the Secretary of Energy?s Gold Medal, and the Outstanding Leadership, Exceptional Service, Scientific Achievement, and Distinguished Service Medals from NASA. Dr. Huntoon received her undergraduate degree from Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana, and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Dr. Huntoon has authored or co-authored over 200 technical publications and books. She has served on one National Research Council committee, Opportunities for Accelerating Characterization and Treatment of Waste at DOE Nuclear Weapons Sites.