Fisheries Science and Management: Expert Reports

The division produces 60-70 reports per year. These reports are unique, authoritative expert evaluations. Each report is produced by a committee of experts selected by the Academy to address a particular statement of task and is subject to a rigorous, independent peer review. The experts who volunteer their time participating on study committees are vetted to make sure that the committee has the range of expertise needed to address the task, that they have a balance of perspectives, and to identify and eliminate members with conflicts of interest. All reports undergo a rigorous, independent peer review to assure that the statement of task has been addressed, that conclusions are adequately supported, and that all important issues raised by the reviewers are addressed. Thus, while the reports represent views of the committee, they also are endorsed by the Academy.

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Showing results 1 - 5 of 26

Review of the Marine Recreational Information Program (2017)

Recreational fishing is a popular activity in the United States. Although individual anglers generally take small numbers of fish, collectively, the large number of anglers can have a substantial impact on fish populations. For some species, the impact of recreational catch even exceeds the amount taken by the commercial sector. To collect information on fishing catch, the National Marine Fisheries Service started a survey program in 1979... More >>

Report in Brief

A Review of the Use of Science and Adaptive Management in California's Draft Bay Delta Conservation Plan (2011)

Report in Brief >> California's draft Bay Delta Conservation Plan—a draft plan to conserve habitat for endangered and threatened species, while continuing to divert water to agriculture and domestic water users in central and southern California—is incomplete and contains critical scientific gaps. The Bay Delta is a large, complex ecosystem that supplies water from the state's wetter northern regions to the drier southern regions, and als... More >>

Report in Brief

Assessment of Sea-Turtle Status and Trends: Integrating Demography and Abundance (2010)

All six species of sea turtles found in U.S. waters are listed as endangered or threatened, but the exact population sizes of these species are unknown due to a lack of key information regarding birth and survival rates. The U.S. Endangered Species Act prohibits the hunting of sea turtles and reduces incidental losses from activities such as shrimp trawling and development on beaches used for nesting. However, current monitoring does not provid... More >>

Report in Brief

Ecosystem Concepts for Sustainable Bivalve Mariculture (2010)

With seafood consumption rising and wild stocks of marine life decreasing, mariculture -- the cultivation of marine organisms in their natural environments -- is becoming an increasingly important source of bivalve shellfish such as oysters, mussels, and clams. However, mariculture operations can affect the integrity of natural ecosystems where they are located, for example, by disturbing marine flora that provide habitat for fish an... More >>

Shellfish Mariculture in Drakes Estero, Point Reyes National Seashore, California (2009)

Drakes Estero, 25 miles northwest of San Francisco, is a marine estuary home to harbor seals, waterfowl, fish, and other marine organisms. Congress designated the estuary a Potential Wilderness in 1976, signifying the intention to incorporate the area into an existing Wilderness area in Point Reyes National Seashore. Drakes Estero is also the site of commercial oyster farming since the 1930s, and Drakes Bay Oyster Company continues to operat... More >>