Ocean Research Program Reviews : Expert Reports

The division produces 60-70 reports per year. These reports are unique, authoritative expert evaluations. Each report is produced by a committee of experts selected by the Academy to address a particular statement of task and is subject to a rigorous, independent peer review. The experts who volunteer their time participating on study committees are vetted to make sure that the committee has the range of expertise needed to address the task, that they have a balance of perspectives, and to identify and eliminate members with conflicts of interest. All reports undergo a rigorous, independent peer review to assure that the statement of task has been addressed, that conclusions are adequately supported, and that all important issues raised by the reviewers are addressed. Thus, while the reports represent views of the committee, they also are endorsed by the Academy.

Search all reports

To search for an exact phrase, use quotation marks (i.e., “Earth and life”)
Showing results 1 - 5 of 21

Review of the Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring Plan (2013)

The world's ocean has already experienced a 30% rise in acidity since the industrial revolution, with acidity expected to rise 100 to 150% over preindustrial levels by the end of this century. Potential consequences to marine life and also to economic activities that depend on a healthy marine ecosystem are difficult to assess and predict, but potentially devastating. To address this knowledge gap, Congress passed the Federal Ocea... More >>

Scientific Ocean Drilling: Accomplishments and Challenges (2011)

Through direct exploration of the subseafloor, U.S.-supported scientific ocean drilling programs have significantly contributed to a broad range of scientific accomplishments in Earth science disciplines, shaping understanding of Earth systems and enabling new fields of inquiry. The programs' technological innovations have played a strong role in these accomplishments. The science plan for the proposed 2013-2023 program presents a strong case fo... More >>

Report in Brief

Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030 (2011)

Report in Brief >> U.S. ocean research depends on a broad range of ocean infrastructure assets—the national inventory of ships and other platforms, sensors and samplers, computational and data systems, supporting facilities, and trained personnel. In order to ensure that essential infrastructure is available for both fundamental research and issues of social importance in 2030, a coordinated national plan for making future strategic investment... More >>

Report in Brief

Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean (2010)

Excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere—in addition to contributing to climate change—is absorbed by the ocean, making sea water more acidic and leading to a suite of changes in ocean chemistry. Preliminary evidence suggests ocean acidification will have negative effects on corals, shellfish, and other marine life, with wide-ranging consequences for ecosystems, fisheries, and tourism. This report, requested by Congress, reviews the current stat... More >>

Report in Brief

Science at Sea: Meeting Future Oceanographic Goals with a Robust Academic Research Fleet (2009)

The U.S. academic research fleet is an essential national resource, providing ships that allow oceanographers to collect measurements and analyze data from the near-shore to the deep ocean. Oceanographers are embracing a host of remote technologies that can facilitate the collection of data, but will continue to require capable, adaptable research vessels for access to the sea. Growing awareness of the ocean's critical role in environmenta... More >>

Report in Brief