Past Event

Challenges in Characterizing Small Particles: Exploring Particles from the Nano- to Microscales

Roundtable Meeting
October 25, 2010 - October 26, 2010

Location:
The Washington Plaza Hotel
10 Thomas Circle NW Washington DC 20005-4106

This one and a half day workshop will explore new opportunities, challenges, and approaches to characterizing small particles and understanding their impacts. Small particles—about one nanometer to tens of microns—are ubiquitous in the natural and man-made worlds. In many scientific and engineering domains, uncertainty about the properties and chemical composition of small particles limits our ability to understand, predict, and control their applications and impacts.

There will be several overview presentations highlighting the critical importance of small particles in environmental science, materials and chemical sciences, biological science and in engineering. In addition, there will be several "research tool" presentations highlighting new advances in characterizing small particles. Characterization will include static, dynamic, experimental, computational and theoretical characterization.

Registration is free and open to the public, but you must RSVP to attend. If you are interested in attending this workshop and/or presenting a poster, please register using the button below. The deadline for registering to attend the workshop is October 18, 2010.

Poster session: Spaces are available for the poster session. Some funds are available for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows to cover travel expenses.

For more information about the workshop or poster session, please contact Sheena Siddiqui.

Workshop Summaries Resulting from this Event

Challenges in Characterizing Small Particles: Exploring Particles from the Nano- to Microscales: A Workshop Summary (2012)

Small particles—ranging in size from about one nanometer to tens of microns—are ubiquitous in the natural and engineered worlds. They are in the air, soil, and water on Earth and at the farthest reaches of the universe. But their properties and chemical composition are little understood, restricting scientists' and engineers' ability to predict and control their applications and impacts in both natural and engineered systems. O... More >>