Study in Progress

Evaluation of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Current stage:

Statement of Task

The National Academy of Sciences will convene an ad hoc committee to examine the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC). This committee will evaluate the purpose, goals, and scientific merits of the program within the context of similar programs, and whether the LCC has resulted in measurable improvements in the health of fish, wildlife, and their habitats. This will include:

-- An evaluation of the scientific merit of the LCC program and its goals.

-- A comparison of the stated purpose and goals of the LCC with other similar programs. How are these programs similar, and how do they differ? Is there substantial overlap in their mission and purpose? If so, is there rationale for and benefit from this overlap? Is there sufficient coordination with these related programs?

-- A comparison of the types of projects supported by LCC and related programs.

* Do the projects supported by the LCC overlap significantly with the traditional portfolio of other FWS programs? If so, is there rationale for and benefit from this overlap? Is there sufficient coordination with these related programs? What benefit, if any, is gained by moving and/or consolidating this work within the LCC? What effectiveness or efficiency is lost, if any, by housing this work within the LCC?

* Do the projects supported by the LCC overlap significantly with the portfolio of related programs in other agencies? If so, is there rationale for and benefit from this overlap? Is there sufficient coordination with these related programs?

-- An examination of the evaluation process for the LCC program. What is FWS? strategy to assess the effectiveness of the LCC program? What are reasonable short, medium, and long-term metrics for the effectiveness of the LCC in achieving its stated purpose and goals?

-- An assessment of the impacts of the LCC. What goals have been achieved? What improvements in managing habitat and fish and wildlife species might be reasonable to expect from the LCC in the timeframe it has existed? What longer-term impacts are likely to be realized?