BESR Webinar


 

 
BESR/COSG Webinar | Cascadia Megaquake

Part 1

Thursday, May 18, 2017 @ 3:00 pm Eastern (12:00 pm Pacific)


Current science on earthquake source and related hazards

        Recording is now available

 

Moderated by C. Scott Cameron, BESR Member

Part 2

August 16, 2017 @ 3:00 PM Eastern/12:00 PM Pacific

Current strategies to mitigate loss of life

  • Yumei Wang, Geotechnical Engineer, Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries
  •  Timothy Walsh, Assistant State Geologist, Washington Geological Survey

Click to REGISTER

Part 3

July/August 2017

Emerging opportunities to reduce uncertainty and provide early warning



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USING GIS TO MAKE URBAN MOBILITY MORE SUSTAINABLE
Prof. Harvey J. Miller / March 1, 2:00-4:00pm EST

Link to recording | Presentation slides (PDF) | Webinar Information

 

 

A LANDSCAPE RESTORATION PUZZLE: WHEN “NATURAL” ISN’T WHAT YOU THOUGHT IT WAS
Friday, January 29, 2016 | 1:00 PM Eastern (10:00 AM Pacific)

 

Slides: PPT | PDF

WebEx Recording

 

Introduction:
Study of the processes that change and shape the earth’s surface shows the profound influences that human modification can have on landscapes at a regional scale. Hillsides erode through time and deposit sediment via rivers and streams to the valleys below. Human activity lends an imprint to these deposits that can be difficult to distinguish without careful investigation. Dr. Dorothy Merritts and her research collaborators have unraveled the natural and human processes that have shaped riverine landscapes in the eastern United States – and propose a surprising pre-industrial scenario that explains high sediment loads in the Chesapeake Bay and other water bodies. It also matters to how streams are restored. The webinar will look more deeply at her research and the fascinating story it weaves among geomorphology, ecosystems, and human history.

 

Structure:
The Board will host a 60-minute webinar with an expert presentation. A question and answer period will follow, moderated by Board members and National Research Council staff.

 

Speaker: 

 Dr. Dorothy Merritts, Department of Earth and Environment at Franklin & Marshall College

Dorothy Merritts (B.Sc. Indiana University of Pennsylvania, M.Sc. Stanford University, Ph.D. University of Arizona) is a geologist with expertise in streams, rivers, and other landforms, and on the impact of geologic processes, climate change, and human activities on the form and history of Earth's surface. Her primary research in the eastern United States is in the Appalachian mid-Atlantic region, where she is investigating the role of human activities in transforming the upland woodlands and valley bottom wetland meadows of Eastern North America to a predominantly agricultural and mixed-industrial/urban landscape since European settlement. Associated with this work is developing new methods of wetland, floodplain, and stream restoration that rely upon geomorphic investigation. She also is using lidar to map the geomorphic evidence for continuous permafrost from the last glacial maximum throughout Pennsylvania and Maryland.

 

 

BESR Point of Contact: Nicholas Rogers | nrogers@nas.edu

 

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DRONES FOR THE EARTH SCIENCES: APPLICATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS
Monday, 22 June 2015 | 1:00 PM Eastern (10:00 AM Pacific)

 

Link to Recording

 

The Board hosted a 60-minute webinar with two expert presentations. A question and answer period will follow, moderated by Board members and National Research Council staff.

 

The topic of drones for earth sciences will be covered in two segments:

  1. Role of drones in earth sciences and applications for GIS
  2. Drones and earth science at the Federal Government

 

Speakers and Presentations (PDF):

 

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BESR's Inaugural Webinar

UNEARTHING CITIZEN SCIENCE 
Friday, 5 December 2014 | 12:00 PM (EST)

 

MUKI HAKLAY

  Presentation: Citizen Science: an overview

Professor Muki (Mordechai) Haklay is a professor of Geographical Information Science (GIScience) at the department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, UCL where he co-direct the Extreme Citizen Science (ExCiteS) group (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/excites). The group aim is to enable any community, regardless of their literacy, to initiate and run citizen science activities.


DAVID APPLEGATE

  Presentation: Citizen Science at the U.S. Geological Survey

David Applegate is Associate Director for Natural Hazards at the U.S. Geological Survey and is co-chair of the National Science and Technology Council's interagency Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction.


SUSAN BRANTLEY

  Presentation: Citizen Science in Baseline Monitoring for Unconventional Hydrocarbon Development


Susan L. Brantley is Distinguished Professor of Geosciences at Penn State University where she also serves as the Director of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute. She currently directs an NSF-sponsored project called Shale Network that works to publish water quality and quantity data to the web in areas of shale gas development in the northeastern U.S.A.


Session moderated by Gene Whitney, BESR Member 



 Audio Recording (due to technical recording issues, Muki Haklay audio is not available)